Paprika Brasil Hermes : Perfume News

The Hermessence collection will introduce a sixth fragrance called Paprika Brasil this fall. The perfume was “inspired by the book Tristes Tropiques. Written by Claude Lévi-Strauss, the anthropologist discusses the precious wood called bois de braise (from which the name “Brazil” is derived) and the effects of the introduction in Europe of American and oriental spices.” Jean-Claude Ellena, Hermès in-house perfumer, is the author of the composition. (from cosmeticnews)

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11 Comments

  • Nina: Exciting information, BdJ! I’m not sure about the paprika, but I love most of the Hermessences dearly, and I can fantasise about a brazil-nut note… July 26, 2006 at 10:24am Reply

  • Mercedes Rey: Oh, no, another Hermessence!!!!!!!!!!My credit card is already frightened…I love all the Hermessences just a bit too much, what a disgrace. And waiting for it until fall…I would probably love this one too, sounds different. By the way, Robin, this summer I´m wearing Osmanthe Yunnan a lot, I really love it much more now. July 26, 2006 at 10:48am Reply

  • cynthia: Wow! Exciting news! July 26, 2006 at 12:01pm Reply

  • Christina H.: Sounds interesting but I wish they’d release a better description of what it’s comprised of!If it has some sweetness to it, than they’ll be getting some more business from me.Thank you for the news! July 26, 2006 at 12:30pm Reply

  • BoisdeJasmin: Nina, I also love the entire collection, and I am looking forward to Paprika Brasil. Cannot wait for its release. July 26, 2006 at 2:27pm Reply

  • Laura: Yumm, this sounds delightful! (Hope it is.) July 26, 2006 at 10:55am Reply

  • violetnoir: Whoa! This sounds completely original. I can’t wait to try it.

    Hugs! July 26, 2006 at 3:41pm Reply

  • chaya ruchama: I’m rabidly intrigued…unfortunately, if it’s good, I’ll probably wind up buying the traveler size [4 small bottles].

    When is this new baby expected?

    Thanks for the heads up ! July 26, 2006 at 8:44pm Reply

  • Jenny: Well this sounds so odd that I have to try it. July 26, 2006 at 8:23pm Reply

  • Katie: Oh cool! I am really looking forward to this one. Paprika! EEEE! But I wonder which sort of paprika? Is it the sweet strong Hungarian kind, or a slightly fiery Spanish kind, or ???? Oh shoot, now I am all impatient wondering, hehehe! *Secretly hopes for something with heat* July 26, 2006 at 8:53pm Reply

  • Evan: Brazilwood is known to me mostly because it was used as a source of red dye and dye-based painting pigment in the later middle ages. The name of the country probably came from the bright red dye obtained from the wood; the root of the word “brazil” is “brazier” and, as noted, “braise”. The red dye obtained from brazilwood was enormously popular for both cloth dyeing and painting (especially in manuscripts) because it was cheaper than the other sources of red dye like kermes (from an insect) or madder (from a plant).

    I’ve made both ink and pigment from extracting the dyestuff from brazilwood. It’s an easier process than producing other dye-based pigments (called “lakes”). In order to make a pigment that you can mix with a binder, you have to precipitate the liquid dye onto a substrate like chalk or alum, which is the process shown in these pictures, wherein you can also see a jar full of raw brazilwood shavings (which are a similar color to paprika):

    http://www.evanizer.com/stuff/IMG_4016.jpg

    http://www.evanizer.com/stuff/IMG_4019.jpg

    The brick in the second picture is covered with the precipitated brazilwood pigment (new bricks or unglazed tiles are the traditional substrate used to dry the precipitated pigment). The reason it is so pink is because of the way I extracted it and the whiteness of the alumina that it is precipitated onto.

    The big problem with brazilwood lake is that it is fugitive; that is, it fades very quickly when exposed to light, though you can still see well preserved examples of it in manuscript paintings (the pinkish color in the following manuscript leaf is probably brazilwood dye pigment):

    http://www.metmuseum.org/Works_of_Art/viewOnezoom.asp?dep=7&zoomFlag=0&viewmode=0&item=54%2E1%2E1

    What any of this has to do with perfume, I don’t know. I’m just interested that two of my favorite subjects have converged. July 27, 2006 at 3:02am Reply

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