mustard seeds: 2 posts

Indian Flattened Rice Pilaf (Poha) : Layering Flavors

My first taste of India was completely different from what I anticipated. I arrived at my friend’s apartment in Delhi, my head still aching from jet lag and the kaleidoscopic array of new sensory impressions. “You must be hungry,” said Swati, as she went into the kitchen. It was close to midnight, but the air was still hot and humid, and my shirt stuck to my back. I wasn’t hungry at all, but I still politely ate a bit of the vegetable pilaf she put in front of me. I expected it to be spicy and hot, but instead it was tart and refreshing, reminiscent more of Mediterranean tastes than anything I’ve previously experienced with Indian food. Poha was the start of my love affair with Indian layered flavors.

poha

Poha is the name for flattened rice (sometimes also referred to as beaten rice) that has been parboiled, rolled, flattened, and dried to produce easy-to-cook, nutritious flakes. It’s a Western Indian version of muesli, and it’s a common breakfast dish. Since poha is already cooked, it only requires a brief soaking to turn the thin flakes into plump grains. It absorbs liquids and flavors easily, and poha works well in soups, pilafs, salads, and even desserts. You can use it in any dish in which you would have used couscous, adjusting the cooking times accordingly.

Continue reading →

Lentil Soup with Coriander, Cumin and Peanuts Recipe

Lentil soup and star fruit salad

The flavors of Gujarati cuisine made a strong impression on me during my first visit. Until I started exploring the Western region of India, which consists of the states of Gujarat, Goa and Maharashtra, I had no idea what to expect. I suspected that the flavors would be very different from the Northern Indian fare one commonly finds in restaurants abroad, but I was unprepared for the diversity of tastes I was to encounter. It all started with a simple dish of dal, lentil soup, which is commonly served with rice towards the end of the meal. It looked unassuming—pale orange with green flecks of cilantro and black mustard seeds, but its sweet and tart flavors, with a delicate touch of toasted coriander and cumin, won me over immediately. It was simple, and yet elegant and memorable.

Continue reading →

From the Archives

Latest Comments

  • Julie in Ballet Inspired Perfumes: Victoria, Just re-read your article and missed the book recommendations last time — how wonderful. I want to read them all and will try to save or email this feature.… March 2, 2021 at 7:07pm

  • Carla in 5 Books about Dance and Resilience: I recommend the Disney Plus documentary On Pointe. The review in my paper of choice, The Wall Street Journal, was negative, but I thought the reviewer was completely wrong. I… March 2, 2021 at 9:47am

  • Klaas in 5 Books about Dance and Resilience: Dutch writer Arthur Japin wrote a very, very beautiful novel about Vaslav Nijinsky….It is called Vaslav and covers the tragic years after his marriage with Romola de Pulski and his… March 2, 2021 at 9:25am

  • Klaas in 5 Books about Dance and Resilience: I like the book very much! I’ve read it before and picked it up again to give it another round. Curfew is great for reading 😉 Homans is very, very… March 2, 2021 at 9:11am

Latest Tweets

Design by cre8d
© Copyright 2005-2021 Bois de Jasmin. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy