perfume notes: 2 posts

Online Sources for Learning About Raw Materials

You have to be a sleuth to learn about perfumery. As I already mentioned several times on this blog, there is not one definitive textbook or publication that covers all of the fundamentals but if you’re prepared to search, you can find a wealth of sources. This applies particularly well to the study of perfumery raw materials. Soon enough you find yourself curious about more details than an average fragrance description provides. While articles like the kind I have published in Perfume Notes are helpful, it’s also useful to have a database reference on hand where you can look up the materials you know or scroll through the lists to discover something new. Where does the material come from? How is harvested? How is it processed?

The online raw material catalogs provided by fragrance and flavor suppliers are a great source. They’re typically compiled for potential customers, so they explain the origin of a material, its olfactory characteristics, processing and main components. They might also list regulatory stipulations and other useful details for those who work with these materials. These databases are constantly updated, so I recommend bookmarking them. For your convenience, I have compiled the databases I use the most for my work. I hope that you will find these useful.

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Geranium Notes: The Other Rose of Perfume

What do Elizabeth Bennett and geranium share in common? Elisa explains.

I’ve never heard anyone call geranium their favorite flower. Compared to the more photogenic blooms found in bouquets and floral arrangements, geranium might seem like a workaday houseplant.

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Cheery sidewalk geraniums

If rose and geranium were sisters in a Jane Austen novel, rose would be known as the pretty one and geranium as the sensible one. But geranium, like Elizabeth Bennett, has her own beauty, and is indispensable in rose fragrances!

When we refer to geranium notes, we’re usually talking about the oil of the pelargonium graveolens, also known as the rose geranium. Rose geranium oil contains over 50 organic compounds, but primarily consists of geraniol, nerol, and citronellol. Nerol, so named because it was originally isolated from neroli oil, has a fresh rosy scent and can be found in lemongrass and hops. Citronellol is the familiar pungent citrus smell often found in insect repellants – but it’s also important for creating realistic rose accords. Geraniol, one of the primary components in rose oil, smells – you guessed it – rosy and is also commonly used in fruit flavorings. (I’ve noticed that adding clove to a fruity rose can conjure up a raspberry note.)

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Latest Comments

  • Hamamelis in Recommend Me a Perfume: July 2024: Hi Laura, what about Andy Tauer’s L’air des Alpes Suisses? A real mountain scent, but it may lean masculine though. Another outdoorsy fragrance could be Parfum d’Empire Mal-aime, a unique… July 25, 2024 at 5:43am

  • Aire in Recommend Me a Perfume: July 2024: Sisley Eau de Campagne might be nice. July 24, 2024 at 7:49pm

  • Aurora in Recommend Me a Perfume: July 2024: Hi Emi: two pine scents with sweetness: Annick Goutal Nuit étoilée, very outdoorsy and for a richer, more Christmassy pine, Serge Lutens Fille en Aiguilles. July 24, 2024 at 2:59pm

  • Laura in Recommend Me a Perfume: July 2024: Hi everyone, I am looking for a pergume for a mountain adventure like hiking, walking, etc in a mild climate in August. I would like a scent through which I… July 24, 2024 at 2:11pm

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