Mimosa: 10 posts

Caron Farnesiana : Fragrance Review

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Wilhelmina

Star rating: 5 stars–outstanding/potential classic, 4 stars–very good, 3 stars–adequate, 2 stars–disappointing, 1 star–poor.

Caron Farnesiana defies conventions with its interpretation of violet and almond tinged mimosa notes. The classical softness of mimosa is rendered as suave and tender, yet the effect is more like delicate swirls of incense smoke rather than the swan dawn lightness of spring flowers. Farnesiana has an elegant, mellifluous character, yet at times it speaks in sultry whispers, with the overall impression of the fragrance being surprising, dramatic and at times unpredictable.

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Annick Goutal Le Mimosa : Fragrance Review

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Le mimosa

Star rating: 5 stars–outstanding/potential classic, 4 stars–very good, 3 stars–adequate, 2 stars–disappointing, 1 star–poor.

To me few scents evoke spring more than the honey and cucumber fragrance of mimosa. Even before the snow melted on the streets of Kiev, sidewalk vendors would suddenly appear with large baskets of fluffy mimosa branches wrapped in wet newspaper. I could never resist the sunny yellow color nor the warm, sweet fragrance, and I happily traded my school lunch allowance for a smell of spring. Today I would gladly exchange the most precious perfume in my collection for the utter joy of burying my face in a soft cloud of fragrant mimosa orbs, staining my fingers with indelible newspaper ink and feeling my pulse quicken at the thought of spring being near. Therefore, I simply could not wait for Annick Goutal Le Mimosa to arrive on our shores, even if the real mimosa rarely does. Launched this month as a part of the soliflores collection, Néroli, Des Lys, La Violette, Le Muguet and Le Chèvrefeuille, Le Mimosa is Camille Goutal and Isabelle Doyen’s ode to spring.

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Frederic Malle Une Fleur de Cassie : Perfume Review

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Cassie

Star rating: 5 stars–outstanding/potential classic, 4 stars–very good, 3 stars–adequate, 2 stars–disappointing, 1 star–poor.

Frédéric Malle Une Fleur de Cassie inspires a comparison with espresso–the initial bitterness serves as a prelude for the caramelized and nutty undertones. Similarly, the dark powdery opening of Une Fleur de Cassie hides the warmth of violets and rose wrapped in mimosa. The fragrance also has an odd wet paper note before it takes an unexpected twist into the almond and violet. It’s an acquired taste, but once I acquired it, I fell in love with Une Fleur de Cassie’s juxtaposition of accords and tonalities.

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Slatkin Persian Lime Blossom & Mimosa : Perfume Review

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Gauguinmagoes

Star rating: 5 stars–outstanding/potential classic, 4 stars–very good, 3 stars–adequate, 2 stars–disappointing, 1 star–poor.

The beauty of Slatkin Persian Lime Blossom & Mimosa lies as much in the perfection of the facets that come together to form this sunlit and vivid composition as in its unpredictable treatment of the floral theme. Unlike the more classical mimosa etudes a la L’Artisan Mimosa pour Moi and Parfums de Nicolaï Mimosaique, Persian Lime Blossom & Mimosa does not play up the powdered almond richness of the note. Instead, the perfumer Christophe Laudamiel, who created the fragrance for Slatkin & Company, turns the velvety softness of mimosa into the delicate precision of Venetian lace woven out of the golden threads. …

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Jean Patou Vacances : Fragrance Review

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Matisse_woman_before_acquarium

Star rating: 5 stars–outstanding/potential classic, 4 stars–very good, 3 stars–adequate, 2 stars–disappointing, 1 star–poor.

Prompted by a question about a fragrance I would associate with Matisse, I began to reflect on what perfume would capture the strength of the lines, the vibrancy of the colors, the alluring delicacy of the finished composition as well as the Mediterranean feel pervading his works. If there is one fragrance that contains all of these elements, it must be Jean Patou Vacances.

Vacances was created in 1936, alluding to the introduction of the first paid holidays in France. Its vibrant spicy opening shimmers like sun rays hitting the water, before rich greenness softens the sizzle of carnation. Galbanum with its scent of sliced green peppers is a perfect counterpoint to the wave of honeyed powderiness that emerges next. The breath of lilac wafts in like a scent carried by the wind through an open window. At first, it merely teases, weaving gently through the heart of the composition, until finally it solidifies, resting on a soft musky base. The colors of the composition are hardly subtle—the intense verdancy of hyacinth and galbanum, the dark powderiness of mimosa, the rich sweetness of lilac. Yet, the resulting fragrance is a perfect juxtaposition of delicate peppery and green sap notes folding into honeyed sweetness. In my romanticized vision of a town on the Mediterranean coast, this is the scent that would be filling the air.

Painting: Henri Matisse. Woman before Aquarium. 1921. Oil on canvas. Barnes Foundation, Lincoln University, Merion, PA. Thank you for a great question goes to my painter friend Laura, whose site is such an inspiration for me.

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