Chanel Coco Mademoiselle Giveaway

I hope that everyone had a great weekend We have a great giveaway today thanks to Tara. She would like to give away a full bottle of Chanel Coco Mademoiselle EDP, 50ml. It’s a tester bottle, but the perfume is fresh. Tara can send her package anywhere in the USA or Europe.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank our entire Bois de Jasmin community for your generosity and kindness, whether it means giveaways like this, advice or comments that you share. You’re the best!

We are not responsible for custom duties, leaks or damage during transit or for lost packages.

To participate, please answer these questions. I will randomly draw one winner.

1.  Tara would like to find a good perfume for the autumn-winter season, “something that feels warm, comforting, but not overly sweet. I don’t like gourmands, vanillas or anything that smells of pastries. Spices and woods are more than welcome.”
2. May I contact you via email to notify you of your win and share your email with Tara?

The contest will be open till Thursday. I will contact the winner by email and will announce their name here.

Night, Moon and Jasmine

I enjoyed your comments on the recent post when I’ve asked you to match scents to a baroque Spanish still life. In my collection, I have a beautiful Mughal period miniature depicting a woman draped in jasmine. I couldn’t resist tossing it among–which fragrance would you pick to represent the mood of this painting.

As you can see, the lady has a bottle of perfume and a flask of rosewater in front of her.

Image by Bois de Jasmin

The Allure of Extrait de Parfum

If you were a medieval caliph and desired a fragrance to delight your senses, your royal perfumers would have mixed Tibetan musk with an equal amount of Yemeni ambergris and steeped the mixture in ben tree oil over a weak fire. They would have stirred it with a gold spoon and used a silver vessel to refine it further until the liquid itself turned golden and smelled like paradise itself. If you were the wife of the caliph Harun al-Rashid, the one of One Thousand and One Nights fame, then you would have asked for a touch of jasmine oil to remind you of Persian gardens in bloom. According to the 14th century Egyptian scholar Al-Nuwayri, such were indeed the refined tastes of his time.

The luxurious, oil-based perfumes Al-Nuwayri describes in his book are the distant ancestors of the modern extrait de parfum. Today, the extrait de parfum is usually diluted in alcohol, but the proportion of fragrant oils in its formula is still sumptuously high. In my recent FT magazine column, The Allure of Extrait de Parfum, I describe what makes extrait de parfum different and why it still has a place in our perfume wardrobe.

As I’ve noted in my article about perfume concentrations, the proportion of oil alone doesn’t matter as much as the ingredients themselves. However, the parfum, along with the Eau de Cologne, is the oldest way of enjoying fragrance. It was meant to be applied directly on skin, allowing it to envelop the wearer in a soft cloud of scent. For instance, the great classics like Chanel No 5, Guerlain Jicky or Caron Tabac Blond were created as such concentrated blends. Their lighter variations appeared later in the second half of the 20th century when atomizers became popular. To continue reading, please click here.

What are some of your favorite extrait de parfums?

Photography by Bois de Jasmin

Spanish Still Life : A Study of Jasmine and Fruit

I first saw this painting during an exhibition in Brussels devoted to Spanish still life art and it stayed in my memory. The artist behind it is Benito Espinós (1748-1818), whose still life floral arrangements are among the most dramatic and varied.

If you could match this painting to a perfume, what would you select?

Photography by Bois de Jasmin, detail, at the Spanish Still Life exhibit, Bozar.

The Olfactory Equivalent of a Souffle

Over dinner recently at Le Soufflé, a Paris restaurant specializing in the famed French dish, my friend asked me if there are any fragrances that suggest the same lightness and sensuality as this airy confection. The question took me by surprise, but I liked the idea of finding a floral scent that felt weightless without being fleeting. This was no simple task because the floral family is vast, ranging from fresh blends based on orange blossom and lily of the valley to smoldering potions of tuberose and jasmine.


In my recent FT column, The Olfactory Equivalent of a Soufflé, I take up the challenge and select three perfumes that capture the airy and decadent qualities of a soufflé.

The first fragrance I selected was Cartier’s Baiser Volé, a composition of white blossoms glazed with vanilla. Its green, sparkling opening includes rose, gardenia and white Casablanca lilies, while the sweetness is tempered by the cool touch of woods, subsiding in the drydown to musk and cedar. Despite its caressing, velvety impression, Baiser Volé retains its effervescent personality from the first to the last accord. To continue reading, please click here.

Image via FT

From the Archives

Latest Comments

  • Fazal in Chanel Coco Mademoiselle Giveaway: Have you tried Kenzo Jungle Homme. I like it even more than Kenzo Jungle Elephant. Kenzo Jungle Homme is in the same vein but a bit friendlier than its female… October 15, 2019 at 2:40am

  • Sss in Night, Moon and Jasmine: Omg! What a painting! Do you have more info on its history and who it is by? How did you come by it? October 15, 2019 at 1:32am

  • Sss in Night, Moon and Jasmine: Omg! What a painting! Do you have more info on its history and who it is by? How did you come by it? October 15, 2019 at 1:31am

  • MK in Chanel Coco Mademoiselle Giveaway: Hello, I recommend Ambre Fetiche by Annick Goutal. It’s a long-lasting amber and a comfort scent great for fall days. I also recommend Serge Lutens Vetiver Oriental. It has a… October 15, 2019 at 12:18am

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