Atelier Cologne Cedrat Enivrant : Fragrance Review

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Atelier Cologne’s challenge is to take the citrus cologne idea and spin it into several guises–rose, patchouli, iris, vetiver, and even leather. The most successful variations, on the other hand, are the brand’s perfumes that dance around the classical citrus but smell modern and distinctive. Orange Sanguine does the seemingly impossible with its long lasting juicy orange, and now Cédrat Enivrant reinvents the bitter lemon.cedrat atelier

Citron, cédrat in French, is a large fruit with tart flesh and sweet, edible peel. It smells like lemon peels crushed with dry Mediterranean herbs and a handful of cherry blossoms. In comparison, the ordinary lemon is downright boring. For Cédrat Enivrant, perfumer Ralf Schwieger took the floral citron and accented it with enough lime and basil to give his fragrance an instant bracing effect. It’s as if you had crushed  lemons and limes for a pitcher of lemonade and then took a deep inhale of the messy, oily pile of peels. The initial jolt is enough to wake you up!

Then Cédrat Enivrant calms down to an elegant citrus that, despite its brightness, feels neither sharp nor overly zesty. It’s an etude in yellow and green with plenty of mint and basil thrown in with the citrus zest. The fragrance is rounded out by a generous dose of creamy musk and lightened by spicy accents  of pepper and juniper berries. It clings to skin for many hours, and even at the end of the day you smell the bitter white part of the lemon, the waxy peel and a few basil leaves. This sounds simple, but Cédrat Enivrant is unexpectedly addictive.

There is hardly any sweetness and few flowers, so Cédrat Enivrant has a sober feel along the lines of Dior Eau Sauvage, Chanel Eau de Cologne and Thierry Mugler Cologne. It’s cooling and bracing enough to be perfect as a quick refreshment but sufficiently polished to be worn for formal occasions.

Like Orange Sanguine, Cédrat Enivrant is suitable for men and women, but its dryness paired with its bitterness might read as too classically masculine. (If you’re in that camp, try something with a hint of sugar such as Acqua di Parma Arancia di Capri, Roger & Gallet Fleur d’Osmanthus or Jo Malone Orange Blossom).

I, on the other hand, like Cédrat Enivrant for its jaunty, yet suave aura. To wear it is to step into the fantasy world of the French Riviera that exists only in 1960s technicolor films. I might as well be donning oversized sunglasses, a white linen shift dress and driving a convertible along the Corniche. Since I don’t even have a driver’s license, this is a wild fancy, but what’s the use of perfume if not to let one daydream a little.

Atelier Cologne Cédrat Enivrant Cologne Absolue includes notes of Moroccan cedrat, Mexican lime, Calabrian bergamot, mint, basil, juniper berries, tonka bean, vetiver, and elemi. 30ml/$65, 100ml/$105, 200ml/$170. Available at Sephora, Luckyscent, Aedes, Neiman Marcus, and other retailers.

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85 Comments

  • solanace: Driving a vintage convertible through the roads of La Corniche makes a great daydream. There is gotta be a floating silk scarf, too. Not the kind I get at H&M, real silk. 🙂 And yes, tecnicholor light, please!

    Orange Sanguine is great, I´ll definitely try this one. April 28, 2014 at 7:25am Reply

    • Victoria: Yes, a scarf to float in the wind! For some reason, I’m imagining something pale blue. As you can see, I’ve got that fantasy all worked out, apart from the important essentials (the driving part!) 🙂 April 28, 2014 at 10:51am Reply

      • George: Driving around Nice wearing a long flowing scarf, i hope things don’t get too Isadora Duncan……… April 28, 2014 at 10:58am Reply

        • Victoria: I wouldn’t keep my scarf that long! 🙂 April 28, 2014 at 11:08am Reply

        • Solanace: Me neither! Lesson learned. 🙂 April 28, 2014 at 4:59pm Reply

  • Brainfodder: Oooo, I love this cologne, it’s exhilarating! I’m a great fan of Eau Sauvage, and this finds the middle ground for me – truly androgynous.

    I ordered the postcard sample box from AC a couple of weeks ago… what a glorious way to explore a fragrance house. All credit to them, the package was an utter delight, beautifully presented and put together.

    If only Chanel and Guerlain had a similar way to explore their range! April 28, 2014 at 8:14am Reply

    • Victoria: AC often has fantastic ad materials accompanying its fragrances, and they manage to convey the mood really well. But the ones for Orange Sanguine and Mistral Patchouli are my favorites. April 28, 2014 at 10:52am Reply

  • Anne of Green Gables: Orange Sanguine was excellent and Cedrat Enivrant sounds like something I’d enjoy. I’m a little weird but I love the bitterness of piths more than the sweetness in citrus perfumes.

    What did you think of Arancia di Capri? I received a sample last year and used it during grim winter days to daydream about holidays in the Mediterranean. April 28, 2014 at 8:59am Reply

    • Victoria: I’m the same way. I love the bitterness of lemon peel, and I often chop the whole lemon and mix it with salad leaves, parsley and onions for a salad. It goes well with fish or grilled meat. Or even just on its own with crusty bread.

      Arancia di Capri is a very nice orange cologne, and it smells a bit like a popsicle. I like it, but I prefer the sweet and sour Orange Sanguine. April 28, 2014 at 11:00am Reply

      • Anne of Green Gables: So I’m not alone? 😉 Your salad sounds perfect for summer & BBQ. I didn’t have high expectations for Arancia di Capri but it was much nicer than I thought. It was sweet but not ‘sticky’ (if you know what I mean).

        I often have problems with orange in fragrances because most orange fragrances smell synthetic to me, like orange flavoured jelly which I don’t like. When sweetness isn’t balanced by bitterness and sourness, I find it difficult to stand. That’s why Orange Sanguine was such a revelation for me – the balance was just perfect! April 28, 2014 at 12:03pm Reply

        • Victoria: I know exactly what you mean about the fake orange notes that make me think of candy or orange flavored sodas. Arancia di Capri doesn’t go in that direction, thankfully, but like you, I found Orange Sanguine to be the most perfect orange. April 28, 2014 at 4:01pm Reply

          • Anne of Green Gables: Yes, exactly! They make me feel sick. I’m not so fond of synthetic orange flavours. I much prefer the real one. Citrus colognes might be an old idea but I’m constantly fascinated by how different varieties of citrus fruits can have such different nuances. For example, there’s something in clementines (in contrast, I love satsumas) that always bothers my nose and I still can’t figure out what it is. April 29, 2014 at 5:51am Reply

            • Victoria: Maybe, it might be the aldehydes? All citrus fruit contain them, but clementines and mandarins even more so. April 29, 2014 at 10:24am Reply

              • Anne of Green Gables: After reading that “Unlike other citrus oils, mandarin oil and cold-pressed oils of tangerine and clementine contain considerable amounts of mehtyl N-methylanthranilate” (Scent and Chemistry, p. 227), I’ve been wondering whether that is the culprit but maybe, it’s the aldehydes as you suggested. I need to look into this more. April 30, 2014 at 4:13pm Reply

                • Victoria: Try to smell methyl anthranilate on its own. It smells sweet and fruity. My perfumery school teacher claimed that most people can’t detect it in the mandarin oil, although I definitely notice a difference between mandarin and orange right away when I smell the oils separately. May 1, 2014 at 4:26am Reply

                  • Anne of Green Gables: I’ve never smelled methyl anthranilate in isolation so I will try to find some. Your nose must be really sensitive to it! May 1, 2014 at 1:42pm Reply

                    • Victoria: I’m not sensitive to all materials equally, but methyl anthranilate is something I pick up quickly. My teacher, on the other hand, had a bloodhound’s nose when it came to indole. He could detect it in the tiniest amounts! May 1, 2014 at 1:49pm

  • Aisha: “…but what’s the use of perfume if not to let one daydream a little.”

    Absolutely!

    Orange Sanguine is my favorite Atelier cologne. (The postcard they made for the fragrance hangs on my bulletin board in my home office.) I really hope to try Cédrat Enivrant soon. Sounds like a wonderful warm-weather fragrance. And yes, that postcard is quite pleasing too. 😉 April 28, 2014 at 9:34am Reply

    • Victoria: I went through so much of Orange Sanguine that I’m glad to switch to something else for the summer. Cedrat might seem more conventionally masculine than Orange, so do sample it first. I don’t mind a bit of dry cocktail feel, but it depends on how much sweetness you like with your citrus. April 28, 2014 at 11:07am Reply

      • Aisha: Will sample first. Definitey.

        I enjoyed both Orange Sanguine and Mandarine Basilic last summer. Would you say Mandarine Basilic is a sweet scent? April 28, 2014 at 11:19am Reply

        • Victoria: It’s not that sweet, but it’s sweeter than Cedrat Enivrant. But if you like the combination of citrus and basil, you might like Cedrat very much. It also lasts and lasts, which is unexpected for a citrus perfume. April 28, 2014 at 11:23am Reply

  • Anka: Yes, jaunty and suave, that’s how I perceive Cédrat Enivrant, too!
    Today I layered Orange Sanguine with a bit of Herba Fresca and got a similar fresh aromatic aroma minus the (delicious) bitterness of CE. April 28, 2014 at 9:37am Reply

    • Victoria: The combination sounds great, Anka, and I can see how it might give the same herbal-bitter effect. Plus, there is plenty of mint in Cedrat too. April 28, 2014 at 11:09am Reply

      • Anne of Green Gables: There’s really plenty of mint in Cedrat? It’s a must try for me then. I don’t know why I’m so obsessed with mint… April 29, 2014 at 5:38am Reply

        • Anka: I love mint too, have you tried Eau Radieuse (Humiecki & Graef)?
          It’s a very tangy and invigorating Eau de Cologne (banana, lemon, mint and rhubarb – sounds sweet, but isn’t, it’s very cooling actually). April 29, 2014 at 6:46am Reply

          • Anne of Green Gables: Hi Anka, glad to meet another mint lover! Thanks for your suggestion. I haven’t heard of the perfume nor the brand but if I can find it in one of the stores in Munich, I’ll give it a try.The combination of the notes you mentioned sounds intriguing. My favouirte mint fragrance is still Herba Fresca. April 29, 2014 at 8:36am Reply

        • Victoria: It contains less than Herba Fresca, but it’s obvious enough that you won’t have to search too much for it.

          Guerlain Homme also contains plenty of mint, by the way. April 29, 2014 at 10:26am Reply

          • Anne of Green Gables: Thanks, V. I do remember Guerlain Homme being nice but I’ll have to try it again. April 30, 2014 at 4:17pm Reply

            • Victoria: Definitely worth revisiting! May 1, 2014 at 4:23am Reply

  • Annikky: Citrus scents usually don’t cause wild waves of excitement in me, but if you say it’s similar in feel to Eau Sauvage and Chanel cologne… Must try, then. Summer Is Coming. April 28, 2014 at 10:23am Reply

    • Victoria: Oh, I forgot another great cologne to mention–Chanel Pour Monsieur. It’s much more classical/retro than even Eau Sauvage, but it’s excellent. And if you like lots of moss, it’s a good one for that. April 28, 2014 at 11:10am Reply

      • Austenfan: One of my favourites from Chanel! April 28, 2014 at 12:57pm Reply

        • Victoria: It’s so terrific that I’m wondering why I haven’t reviewed it yet. April 28, 2014 at 4:03pm Reply

          • Cornelia Blimber: Please do! it is a terrific scent. April 28, 2014 at 4:43pm Reply

          • Austenfan: I’m wondering that too! April 29, 2014 at 7:36am Reply

            • Victoria: Ok, I’ll definitely have to set myself on the right path. 🙂 April 29, 2014 at 10:25am Reply

      • OperaFan: Victoria,
        Do you mean the current version of the Chanel? I’d read a few years back that it was tweaked to become IFRA-friendly…. April 28, 2014 at 3:48pm Reply

        • Victoria: A friend made a decant from her relatively new bottle, and I’m enjoying it. I haven’t compared it side by side, though, but on its own, it’s still excellent. April 28, 2014 at 4:16pm Reply

          • OperaFan: Thanks! It’s always nice to know when reformulations can stand on their own. April 29, 2014 at 11:27am Reply

            • Victoria: Chanel usually does their reformulations well. I don’t have a single Chanel that I can’t wear because of the reformulations. Can’t say the same thing about Dior. April 29, 2014 at 2:15pm Reply

  • George: I didn’t know that that stretch of land that Victoria Page in The Red Shoes gets driven along in that horrible blue dress with that naff little crown on her head had a name, but I do now. I like the idea of similarly being driven along that stretch of road (in my fantasy I have both staff, and also a much prettier dress) so will be making a beeline for Cedrat Envirant sometime soon. April 28, 2014 at 11:03am Reply

    • Victoria: The Red Shoes is the best ballet movie ever made (Black Swan included). Glad to meet another fan.

      But this makes me wonder what perfume Victoria Page would wear? Cedrat Enivrant, nice though it is, doesn’t quite fit my vision of her. April 28, 2014 at 11:13am Reply

      • George: I think the costuming for the film was Jacques Fath and it was filmed two years after Iris Gris came out. The character of Vicky Page might have LITERALLY been wearing it in the film. April 28, 2014 at 11:47am Reply

        • Victoria: Oh, Iris Gris would be perfect–romantic, yet with enough verve, and distinctive too. April 28, 2014 at 3:59pm Reply

      • Theresa: The Red Shoes is my favorite movie, EVER! and I watch a lot of (mostly) old movies. Intellectually I am irritated by the Life vs Art dichotomy it insists on, but I can see how it is necessary for the plot to work. Anything written/directed by Michael Powell and Emerich Pressburger is worth watching – it is sure to be thought provoking and is always a visual delight.

        I’m not sure what Vicky Page would be wearing – she is very young, so something youthful. But she has plenty of family money. April 28, 2014 at 3:23pm Reply

        • Victoria: I am too, especially since it’s modeled upon the common premise in the world of ballet (thankfully, no longer as strictly observed.) One of the reasons I love this movie is because Page is a great dancer as well as a good actress. The supporting characters and other dancers in the film are excellent too, and I can watch it again and again and not get tired of it. April 28, 2014 at 4:15pm Reply

        • George: It’s my favourite film too. April 28, 2014 at 5:51pm Reply

          • Cornelia Blimber: The Red Shoes–wasn’t that an old movie with Lesley Caron? April 29, 2014 at 7:02am Reply

            • George: I think the poster for Gigi has you confused ;-P April 29, 2014 at 7:49am Reply

              • Cornelia Blimber: Gigi ???? April 29, 2014 at 12:38pm Reply

                • George: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0051658/

                  yeah- those red ‘g’s are en pointe, are they not? April 29, 2014 at 12:49pm Reply

                  • Cornelia Blimber: Thank you! …yes…I remember…that movie with Maurice Chevalier playing the jeune premier with his false theeth, poor old thing….but was there not a Red Shoes withe Norma Shearer? April 29, 2014 at 1:48pm Reply

                    • Cornelia Blimber: I googled The Red Shoes, it was Moira Shearer and the character in the film is Vctoria Page! i have a faint memory of that film, was confused indeed. April 29, 2014 at 5:00pm

                    • Victoria: Yes, we weren’t that clear, I’m afraid. Victoria Page is the character in the film. The actress and dancer Moira Shearer will always be associated with that film for me.

                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Red_Shoes_(1948_film)

                      Leslie Caron was a ballet dancer too! April 29, 2014 at 5:11pm

                    • Amer: that has to be the slimmest column that ever appeared here. No room for the reply button. Guinness Record? April 30, 2014 at 5:02pm

            • George: Yeah, but it was Moira shearer- that’s the one we are talking about. An American In Paris (with Leslie Caron) did however also have a ballet sequence inspired by the one in The Red Shoes, so maybe that’s where you are getting mixed up. Or maybe you are confusing Ludmilla Tcherina from The Red Shoes with Leslie Caron? April 29, 2014 at 5:01pm Reply

              • Cornelia Blimber: Thank you for clearing things up, George! It was Leslie Caron, never heard of Ludmilla Tcherina. April 30, 2014 at 5:08am Reply

                • Cornelia Blimber: Thank you as well, Victoria! April 30, 2014 at 5:10am Reply

  • Austenfan: Do you know if a lot of the Ateliers use the same aromachemicals in their base notes?

    I’ve sampled Orange Sanguine quite a few times, and while I adore the opening ( who wouldn’t?) I just can’t bear the drydown. The anticipation of which kind of spoils the whole experience.
    The only one I seem to get on with so far is Vétiver Fatal. I haven’t sampled them all as yet, and I will make sure I do.
    On a plus side, I think their sample set is a bargain, and looks just gorgeous.

    And I wouldn’t mind a trip to the Riviera at all! April 28, 2014 at 12:56pm Reply

    • Victoria: I doubt that most of them use the same ingredients, since they’re made by different perfumers, but if you didn’t like Orange Sanguine, chances are Cedrat Enivrant won’t work either. The drydown has some of the similar musky notes.

      And the sample set is a good bargain, in addition to being such an attractively packaged collection. It makes great gifts. April 28, 2014 at 4:03pm Reply

      • Austenfan: Thanks for your answer! I had figured out that if they were made by different perfumers chances were that the formulas would be very different. But I just wanted to make sure, and as you are such an easy person to ask…
        It must be the musks then in Orange Sanguine. They occasionally bother me in other fragrances, as if they are almost, but not quite, irritating to my nose.

        AC has one of the best sample sets I’ve bought. April 29, 2014 at 7:31am Reply

        • Victoria: That musk in Orange Sanguine is very noticeable once the citrus calms down, but I have a feeling that you’re far more sensitive to it than I am. I compared the two side by side, Orange and Cedrat, and while both have musk, the drydown is not identical. So, you might have more luck with it. April 29, 2014 at 10:48am Reply

  • Lucas: I was never really fond of Orange Sanguine because it was easily turning flat and artificial, plastic-ey on me.
    Cedrat Enivrant serves with all its might. I will wear it very often next summer. April 28, 2014 at 1:11pm Reply

    • Victoria: I remember you didn’t like Orange Sanguine for that reason, but it seems like you found your winner with Cedrat. April 28, 2014 at 4:07pm Reply

  • Ann: I’m having a total yen for this! Just whipped out three that might be similar, to try to satisfy that herbal fizzy citrus inclination. How does CE compare to the Hermes colognes Eau d’Orange Verte and Concentré de Pamplemousse Rose, or even Azemour Les Orangers?

    Oh dear, now I’m awash in all three! April 28, 2014 at 1:46pm Reply

    • Victoria: You smell terrific, Ann! 🙂
      Let’s see, Pamplemousse Rose is sweeter and sharper than Cedrat Enivrant, while the other two are heavier on moss and woods. Imagine freshly sliced lemon, some lime and a handful of herbs, and you’ll have Cedrat. April 28, 2014 at 4:09pm Reply

      • Ann: Hmmm… I had the opportunity to sample Le Labo’s Limette 37, which is a friendly, (but sexy) effervescent lemony lime herbal… but better. I LOVED it, but the price is ridiculous–almost $300 for 50 mls…I think I am talking myself into trying Cédrat Enivrant! April 28, 2014 at 8:32pm Reply

        • Victoria: Ouch! It’s far too much for a cologne. April 29, 2014 at 10:39am Reply

  • Cornelia Blimber: How is this compared to Eau de Fleurs de Cèdrat? April 28, 2014 at 3:02pm Reply

    • Victoria: It has more lemon and lime notes, and the balance is to the citrusy and musky notes, rather than moss, woods and peppery bergamot. April 28, 2014 at 4:10pm Reply

  • Ashley Anstaett: I think that this sounds delightful. A combination of basil and lemon sounds wonderful to me, and I prefer a dry, bitter citrus to a sweet one. Sometimes when citrus is too sweet, it makes me think of Dreamsicles, which I hate. It’s weird, I feel like I should love Dreamsicles but they make me feel absolutely sick!

    I received a miniature today of vintage Monsieur Balmain. I absolutely love it and feel that I will wear it a lot this summer. Does this one compare at all? April 28, 2014 at 3:11pm Reply

    • Victoria: Lucky you! Monsieur Balmain has few rivals. Cedrat has a similar exuberant lemony start, but it’s less sharp and less complex. Monsieur Balmain also takes a darker turn in the end, but Cedrat smells clear and musky (but the musk is soft and fluffy.) April 28, 2014 at 4:12pm Reply

  • Andy: I still haven’t gotten around to trying Cédrat or either of the other two newest Collection Métal ones from Atelier, but I do like the line. Everything I’ve tried smells tastefully casual and tasteful without feeling restrained. Just yesterday I smelled my sample of Rose Anonyme and was struck by how much I still love it, as it’s been a while. So smooth and comfortable. April 28, 2014 at 6:47pm Reply

    • Victoria: And now I hear of a new Atelier Cologne, based on immortelle! We can hardly keep up, Andy. 🙂 April 29, 2014 at 10:48am Reply

  • Figuier: I always love Atelier’s visuals – this one, along with your wonderful French Riviera scenario, has really set me dreaming of summer holidays 🙂

    Sadly, none of the Ateliers have worked for me so far – on me, even Orange Sanguine soon fades to a sticky smell like drying supermarket orange juice, so disappointing. Cedrat sounds a little more promising though, if it doesn’t have the sweetness that bothers me in the others, and I do love the idea of a really bright citrus…will definitely give it a go next time I’m in London. April 29, 2014 at 7:12am Reply

    • Victoria: My husband preferred Cedrat over Orange Sanguine (he also thought that Orange was too “Tropicana” orange juice on him.)

      I’m dreaming of summer holidays too, although I can’t complain as I’ve been getting my fair share of sun last week. April 29, 2014 at 10:50am Reply

  • maja: Can I ruin the dream for you just a little bit? A ride in a convertible in a shift dress probably means messy, uncombable hair for days and sunburns of the highest degree 😀 But I’ d love to join you, however. 😀
    I’d love to try Cedrat, I love lemony concoctions but the musky base worries me a little bit.

    ps. I had a coup de foudre today – Ninfeo Mio! Such a beauty, I couldn’t resist a smaller bottle. Can’t wait for tomorrow to put it on 🙂 April 29, 2014 at 3:33pm Reply

    • Victoria: Not so much ruin, but add the realistic details. Anyway, if I have a good company, even messy hair and a peeling nose are worth the adventure. 🙂

      Oh, Ninfeo Mio is a great choice! It actually gets better and better the longer you wear it, because despite its straightforward green fig and leafy aroma, it has lots of layers to discover. April 29, 2014 at 4:14pm Reply

      • maja: I wish I had a garden similar to the one that inspired the fragrance but I do have a couple of bitter orange trees ad a huge fig tree behind my house so when I stand somewhere in between I get the same smell – crunchy green but milky fig leaf with some petitgrain. I sprayed it 7 hours ago and it is still there. I am happy to have found “my” fig. 🙂 April 29, 2014 at 5:54pm Reply

        • Victoria: You have what seems like paradise to me! Any garden that has a fig and an orange tree can have this distinction. 🙂 April 30, 2014 at 2:48pm Reply

  • Maya: I adore your writing, sheer amount of general (and specific!) knowledge and the fact that you come across as someone with a love of humanity and mankind.
    Best, Maya May 1, 2014 at 1:25pm Reply

    • Victoria: Thank you so much for your warm comment, Maya. It really touched me. 🙂 May 1, 2014 at 1:44pm Reply

  • Soraya: I was given a 30ml vial of Cedrat Enivrant upon purchasing Rose Anonyme, also by the same house. I am absolutely hooked to Cedrat Enivrant now. i typically dont gravitate to citrusy scents as to my untrained nose, most of them remind me of dishwashing liquid (sorry!). but this one is a keeper! although the 100ml and 200ml bottles have yet to make it to our shores. Will be eagerly awaiting this!

    Rose Anonyme was also a nice surprise. I tend to stay away from rosé scents as it evokes memories of my granny which can be too painful to deal with at times (she was my Angel and I loved her so dearly). But the composition in Rosé Anonyme with its patchouli and Oud notes is something extraordinary.

    Your reviews and descriptions are always lovely, Victoria! June 22, 2014 at 12:40pm Reply

  • Novice: Have you tried Atelier Cologne Blanche Immortelle? I usually like any ‘white flower’ fragrance but would be very interested to hear your interpretation of this fragrance and Santal Carmin – the two new offerings in the Collection Metal range from Atelier Cologne. July 9, 2014 at 9:57am Reply

    • Victoria: Not yet, but it’s on my list! I’m behind all of these new Atelier Cologne launches, since they’ve been releasing more and more of them. But the newer ones sound very good. July 9, 2014 at 11:24am Reply

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